Horrible Histories Audio Books

HORRIBLE HISTORIES AUDIO BOOKS : BOOKS AUDIO ONLINE : ONLINE AUDIO BOOKS FOR CHILDREN.

Horrible Histories Audio Books

    horrible histories

  • Horrible Histories is a series of illustrated history books published in the United Kingdom by Scholastic. They are designed to get children interested in history by concentrating on the trivial, unusual, gory, or unpleasant. The series has proved exceptionally successful in commercial terms.
  • Horrible Histories is an animated children’s television series based on the Terry Deary book series of the same name. The series ran for 26 episodes between January 1, 2001 and March 25, 2002.
  • This is some of the other media (besides the main book and magazine series) that the Horrible Histories franchise has stretched out to: There are also quite a number of ‘Horrible Histories Sticker and Activity Books’ (officially called Activity, Gift and Novelty Books, from the Horrible

    audio books

  • An audiobook is a recording that is primarily spoken word. It is often based on a recording of commercial printed material. It is not necessarily an exact audio version of a book.
  • Works produced for distribution on audio media, typically audiotape cassette or audio compact disk (CD). Audio books are usually spoken-word adaptations of works originally created and produced in print.
horrible histories audio books

horrible histories audio books – The Great

The Great Big Book of Horrible Things: The Definitive Chronicle of History's 100 Worst Atrocities
The Great Big Book of Horrible Things: The Definitive Chronicle of History's 100 Worst Atrocities
A compulsively readable and utterly original account of world history—from an atrocitologist’s point of view.
Evangelists of human progress meet their opposite in Matthew White’s epic examination of history’s one hundred most violent events, or, in White’s piquant phrasing, “the numbers that people want to argue about.” Reaching back to 480 BCE’s second Persian War, White moves chronologically through history to this century’s war in the Congo and devotes chapters to each event, where he surrounds hard facts (time and place) and succinct takeaways (who usually gets the blame?) with lively military, social, and political histories. With the eye of a seasoned statistician, White assigns each entry a ranking based on body count, and in doing so he gives voice to the suffering of ordinary people that, inexorably, has defined every historical epoch. By turns droll, insightful, matter-of-fact, and ultimately sympathetic to those who died, The Great Big Book of Horrible Things gives readers a chance to reach their own conclusions while offering a stark reminder of the darkness of the human heart. 20 black-and-white illustrations and 4 maps

Horrible Histories, Terrible Treasures

Horrible Histories, Terrible Treasures
Interactive adventures based on the popular books, and the TV series developed by Lion and CBBC.

Revolting facts and horrid characters come to life, guided by a time travelling Rat who is lost in the sewers of time.

Since Horrible Histories Terrible Treasures first launched in August 2009 it has been CBBC’s top rated game. In 2010 two new adventures were completed along with a special bonus game allowing players to explore even more disgusting eras…

Horrible Histories

Horrible Histories
London, UK. 22/02/2012. Horrible Histories – Barmy Britain premieres at the Garrick Theatre, Charing Cross Road, London, and runs from Tuesday 14th February. For children 6+. Cast is: Benedict Martin and Lauryn Redding. Photo credit: Jane Hobson
horrible histories audio books

horrible histories audio books

Brief Interviews with Hideous Men
David Foster Wallace made an art of taking readers into places no other writer even gets near. The series of stories from which this exuberantly acclaimed book takes its title is a sequence of imagined interviews with men on the subject of their relations with women. These portraits of men at their most self-justifying, loquacious, and benighted explore poignantly and hilariously the agonies of sexual connections.

Amid the screams of adulation for bandanna-clad wunderkind David Foster Wallace, you might hear a small peep. It is the cry for some restraint. On occasion the reader is left in the dust wondering where the story went, as the author, literary turbochargers on full-blast, suddenly accelerates into the wild-blue-footnoted yonder in pursuit of some obscure metafictional fancy. Brief Interviews with Hideous Men, Wallace’s latest collection, is at least in part a response to the distress signal put out by the many readers who want to ride along with him, if he’d only slow down for a second.
The intellectual gymnastics and ceaseless rumination endure (if you don’t have a tolerance for that kind of thing, your nose doesn’t belong in this book), but they are for the most part couched in simpler, less frenzied narratives. The book’s four-piece namesake takes the form of interview transcripts, in which the conniving horror that is the male gender is revealed in all of its licentious glory. In the short, two-part “The Devil Is a Busy Man,” Wallace strolls through the Hall of Mirrors that is human motivation. (Is it possible to completely rid an act of generosity of any self-serving benefits? And why is it easier to sell a couch for five dollars than it is to give it away for free?) The even shorter glimpse into modern-day social ritual, “A Radically Condensed History of Postindustrial Life,” stretches the seams of its total of seven lines with scathing economy: “She laughed extremely hard, hoping to be liked. Then each drove home alone, staring straight ahead, with the very same twist to their faces.” Wallace also imbues his extreme observational skills with a haunting poetic sensibility. Witness what he does to a diving board and the two darkened patches at the end of it in “Forever Overhead”:
It’s going to send you someplace which its own length keeps you from seeing, which seems wrong to submit to without even thinking…. They are skin abraded from feet by the violence of the disappearance of people with real weight.
Of course, not every piece is an absolute winner. “The Depressed Person” slips from purposefully clinical to unintentionally boring. “Tri-Stan: I Sold Sissee Nar to Ecko” reimagines an Arthurian tale in MTV terms and holds your attention for about as long as you’d imagine from such a description. Ultimately, however, even these failed experiments are a testament to Mr. Wallace’s endless if unbridled talent. Once he gets the reins completely around that sucker, it’s going to be quite a ride. –Bob Michaels